Jesus' Footprints

Posts Tagged ‘Abraham

By this we know that we love the children of God, when we love God and keep His commandments.  For this is the love of God, that we keep His commandments. And His commandments are not burdensome – 1 John 5:2, 3.

Last Sabbath I read this definition in my Bible’s dictionary:

Sabbath  A holy day of rest and worship (Exodus 20:8).  The seventh day of the week, from Friday evening to Saturday evening, is the Jewish Sabbath.  The first day of the week, or Sunday, became the Christian Sabbath in memory of the day of Jesus’ resurrection (Mark 16:2).  Early Christians “came together to break bread” (Acts 20:7) on the first day of the week.

According to this definition there are two Sabbaths.  Are there indeed two Sabbaths–one for Jews and one for Christians?  Where in the Bible is this distinction made?  According to the Bible the Sabbath existed long before the Jews did.  So, hSabbath6Gsmow could a day be made for people who did not yet exist?  Simple.  And he said unto them, The sabbath was made for man, and not man for the sabbath (Mark 2:27).  The word used for man here is anthrōpos which means a human being, male or female.  It is clear from Jesus’ own words that the seventh day Sabbath was made for everyone–not just the Jews.

When God created the Sabbath, He had everyone in mind.  It was supposed to be a day of rest for all of us–Jews and Gentiles. We read in Genesis 2:1-3:  And on the seventh day God ended His work which He had done, and He rested on the seventh day from all His work which He had done. Then God blessed the seventh day and sanctified it, because in it He rested from all His work which God had created and made.

Keeping the seventh day Sabbath was so important to God that it was one of His ten moral commandments.  By His own finger, He wrote: “Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days you shall labor and do all your work, but the seventh day is the Sabbath of the Lord your God. In it you shall do no work: you, nor your son, nor your daughter, nor your male servant, nor your female servant, nor your cattle, nor your stranger who is within your gates. For in six days the Lord made the heavens and the earth, the sea, and all that is in them, and rested the seventh day. Therefore the Lord blessed the Sabbath day and hallowed it (Exodus 20:8-11).

Would Jesus thank His followers for changing the Sabbath from the seventh day to the first?  The Sabbath was created as a memorial to the creation and was written in stone which means that it was never meant to be changed.  The moral law represents God who is unchanging.  It represents Jesus who says He is the Lord of the Sabbath because He is the same yesterday, today and tomorrow.  The fourth commandment is the only one which begins with the word, “remember”.  It was given as a reminder to the Jews who were not practicing Sabbath worship while in bondage in Egypt.  So, now that they were free, they could keep the Sabbath.

As Christians, we are supposed to follow Jesus’ example.  It was His custom to worship or attend the synagogue on the Sabbath (Luke 4:16).  Paul kept the Sabbath.  If the day had changed to the first day of the week as some claim, why did Paul wait to preach to the Gentiles the next Sabbath instead of preaching to them on the following day?  Acts 13:42:  And when the Jews were gone out of the synagogue, the Gentiles besought that these words might be preached to them the next sabbathOn the next Sabbath almost the whole city came together to hear the word of God (Acts 13:42, 44).  And he reasoned in the synagogue every Sabbath, and persuaded both Jews and Greeks (Acts 18:4).

Compare Exodus 20:8-11 to: ‘Observe the Sabbath day, to keep it holy, as the Lord your God commanded you. Six days you shall labor and do all your work, but the seventh day is the Sabbath of the Lord your God. In it you shall do no work: you, nor your son, nor your daughter, nor your male servant, nor your female servant, nor your ox, nor your donkey, nor any of your cattle, nor your stranger who is within your gates, that your male servant and your female servant may rest as well as you. And remember that you were a slave in the land of Egypt, and the Lord your God brought you out from there by a mighty hand and by an outstretched arm; therefore the Lord your God commanded you to keep the Sabbath day (Deuteronomy 5:12-15).

Exodus 20:11 is a direct reference to Genesis 2:2, 3.  In Deuteronomy 5:15 is a reminder that the Israelites were slaves in Egypt and that the Lord had delivered them.  As their Deliverer, He was commanding them to keep His Sabbath day holy.  So, we see that the Sabbath reveals God as our Creator and our Redeemer.  Just as God delivered His people from the land of Egypt where they were slaves of the Egyptians, Jesus, delivers us from slavery to sin.

The Sabbath is symbol of restoration, deliverance, liberation.  Many of Jesus’ healings took place on the Sabbath.  It was lawful to do good on the Sabbath.  There is the example where the ruler of the synagogue objected to Jesus healing a woman with an infirmity on the Sabbath, saying, “There are six days on which men ought to work; therefore come and be healed on them, and not on the Sabbath day.”Jesus response was, “Hypocrite! Does not each one of you on the Sabbath loose his ox or donkey from the stall, and lead it away to water it? So ought not this woman, being a daughter of Abraham, whom Satan has bound—think of it—for eighteen years, be loosed from this bond on the Sabbath?” Jesus had loosed the woman from her bondage.  He had delivered her from Satan.  The cripple by the pool was healed from an infirmity he had for thirty-eight years.  Jesus said to him, “See, you have been made well. Sin no more, lest a worse thing come upon you” (John 5:5-14).  Jesus was not breaking the Sabbath as some accused Him of doing.  He was doing the Father’s work.  He was healing people of their infirmities and of their sins and delivering them from the enemy.

Some people use Acts 20:7 to support the idea that the Sabbath had changed.  Let’s see what it says in verses 7-12.

Now on the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul, ready to depart the next day, spoke to them and continued his message until midnight. There were many lamps in the upper room where they were gathered together. And in a window sat a certain young man named Eutychus, who was sinking into a deep sleep. He was overcome by sleep; and as Paul continued speaking, he fell down from the third story and was taken up dead. But Paul went down, fell on him, and embracing him said, “Do not trouble yourselves, for his life is in him.” Now when he had come up, had broken bread and eaten, and talked a long while, even till daybreak, he departed. And they brought the young man in alive, and they were not a little comforted.

This was not a worship service.  The disciples had come together to break bread.
In the Jewish community, to break bread was to share meals.  When the term “breaking bread” is used in the New Testament writings, it is either in context of the Passover Seder, or the weekly community meal (Breaking of Bread the Jewish Understanding
By: Luana Fabri). 

They were in an upper room and Paul was leaving the next day so he had lots to say to them.  This was a farewell meeting.  In fact, he spoke to them until midnight.  No weekly worship service would have lasted that long!  After he revived the young man who had fallen to his death, Paul broke bread and ate then continued talking until daybreak before leaving.  Breaking bread was a regular thing.  In Acts 2:46, 47 we read, So continuing daily with one accord in the temple, and breaking bread from house to house, they ate their food with gladness and simplicity of heart, praising God and having favor with all the people. And the Lord added to the church daily those who were being saved.

Some people cite 1 Corinthians 16:1, 2 as evidence of Sunday worship.  Paul wrote, “Now concerning the collection for the saints, as I have given orders to the churches of Galatia, so you must do also: On the first day of the week let each one of you lay something aside, storing up as he may prosper, that there be no collections when I come. And when I come, whomever you approve by your letters I will send to bear your gift to Jerusalem. But if it is fitting that I go also, they will go with me.”  There is no indication here that this was a public meeting. Paul was merely telling the church members to set aside what they have on the first day of the week and to store it up until he comes.  The person was to begin saving early in the week at home so that he or she didn’t have to wait until Paul came to determine how much would be donated.  Paul didn’t want people to still be collecting donations when he arrived.

No one seemed to have told Paul that the Sabbath had changed.  In Antioch in Pisidia, Paul and his company went into the synagogue on the Sabbath day and sat down (Acts 13:14). When he and Luke were in Philippi, on the Sabbath day they went out of the city to the riverside, where prayer was customarily made and sat down and spoke to the women who met there (Acts 16:13).  One of them was Lydia, the first European convert to the Christian faith (verse 14).  In Acts 18:4, Paul reasoned in the synagogue every Sabbath, and persuaded both Jews and Greeks. Paul was a Christian who was keeping the Sabbath of the Lord his God holy.

Roman Catholic and Protestant churches admit that there is no scriptural evidence of a Sabbath change.  Read their confessions here.

The commandments are mentioned after the resurrection which makes it clear that they were still binding.  Paul wrote, “Owe no one anything except to love one another, for he who loves another has fulfilled the law. For the commandments, “You shall not commit adultery,” “You shall not murder,” “You shall not steal,” “You shall not bear false witness,” “You shall not covet,” and if there is any other commandment, are all summed up in this saying, namely, “You shall love your neighbor as yourself.” Love does no harm to a neighbor; therefore love is the fulfillment of the law” (Romans 13:8-10).  James in his warning against church members showing favoritism, said, If you really fulfill the royal law according to the Scripture, “You shall love your neighbor as yourself,” you do well; but if you show partiality, you commit sin, and are convicted by the law as transgressors. For whoever shall keep the whole law, and yet stumble in one point, he is guilty of all. For He who said, “Do not commit adultery,” also said, “Do not murder.” Now if you do not commit adultery, but you do murder, you have become a transgressor of the law. So speak and so do as those who will be judged by the law of liberty (James 2:8-12).  John warned believers, Little children, keep yourselves from idols” (1 John 5:21).  As we can see from these scriptures the commandments are still the same, why is it that the commandment about the day of worship is the one that was changed? 

There are indeed two Sabbaths–one is God made and the other is man-made.  Many Christians are worshipping on a day which God did not bless or sanctify or claim ownership of.  In the Bible, God says that He is the Lord of the seventh day Sabbath.  Jesus said that He was Lord of the Sabbath.  The Sabbath God made was for everyone not just one group of believers.  The man-made sabbath excludes Jews.  However, as followers of Christ, we ought to be following His example and keep the seventh day Sabbath as was His custom.  After His resurrection, Jesus did not ask His followers to keep the first day of the week as a memorial to His resurrection.  He would not have encouraged them to replace the day which His Father had blessed and had rested upon.  Jesus said, Do not think that I came to destroy the Law or the Prophets. I did not come to destroy but to fulfill. For assuredly, I say to you, till heaven and earth pass away, one jot or one tittle will by no means pass from the law till all is fulfilled. Whoever therefore breaks one of the least of these commandments, and teaches men so, shall be called least in the kingdom of heaven; but whoever does and teaches them, he shall be called great in the kingdom of heaven” (Matthew 5:17-19).

Baptism, not Sunday worship is the memorial of Christ’s resurrection.  Baptism is the memorial of Christ’s death, burial and resurrection.   Or do you not know that as many of us as were baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into His death? Therefore we were buried with Him through baptism into death, that just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life. For if we have been united together in the likeness of His death, certainly we also shall be in the likeness of His resurrection, knowing this, that our old man was crucified with Him, that the body of sin might be done away with, that we should no longer be slaves of sin” (Romans 3:3-6).  

There is one Lord, one faith, one baptism; one God and Father of all (Ephesians 4:5, 6) and one Sabbath which is the Lord’s.  Which Sabbath are you going to keep–the Lord’s or man’s?

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Love suffers long and is kind – 1 Corinthians 13:4

imagesCA2VQQABDuring His ministry here on earth, Jesus demonstrated His love for humanity through kindness.  Zaccheus, the tax collector, treated like an outcast, was the person whom Jesus watned to spend time with.  He was kind to the tax collector in that He treated him as a person.  Zaccheus was up in a tree because he wanted to see Jesus.  Jesus called out to him, inviting him to come down.  He had singled Zaccheus out and made it clear that He loved and accepted him.  He even called him a son of Abraham.

Jesus saw that Zaccheus was ready to accept Him as His Savior.  The man had gone to such lengths to get a glimpse of him.  Jesus’ act of kindness changed Zaccheus.  It made him aware of his own sinfulness and selfishness–his shortcomings.  As a result, he wanted to make amends to all those he had cheated.  He was genuinely sorry and that very day he was saved.  An act of kindess brought salvation to a sinner and his household.

In acts of kindness we are representing Christ and carrying out His commandment, “Love your neighbor”.

03-032To defeat the enemy, one has to know him first.  The Bible teaches us everything we need to know about the devil.  He exists. He is not a figment of our imagination.

  • He was once  an angel named Lucifer.  He was an anointed covering cherub, perfect in beauty.  He had been in the Garden of Eden.  He was covered in precious jewels.  He was perfect in all his ways from the day he was created until iniquity was found in him (Ezekiel 28:12-15)
  • He became proud and ambitious, desiring to be like God.  He envisioned exalting his throne above the stars of God, ascending above the heights of the clouds.  He was no longer satisfied with the privileges he already had.  He wanted more.  Pride, envy and   covetousness consumed him and ultimately led him into rebellion.  Using his wisdom, he managed to get one third of the angels on his side.
  • As a result he was cast down from Heaven, an event Jesus Himself witnessed.  “I      beheld Satan as lightning fall from Heaven.” – Luke 10:18.
  • He was cast down to the earth.  “Woe to the inhabiters of the earth and of the sea! For the devil is come down unto you, having great wrath, because he knoweth that he hath but a short time.” – Revelation 12:12.
  • Lucifer after sinning against God was no longer a light bearer.  He became Satan, which means Adversary.
  • He is known by many names.  Revelation 12:9 refers to him as the old serpent called the devil and Satan.  When he was in the Garden of Eden, he used as his medium a serpent, the subtlest of the animals.
  • Using subtlety instead of an outright attack on God, Satan managed to deceive Eve into sinning.  He lied to her by  downplaying the consequences of sin.   “Ye shall not surely die.” – Genesis 3:4.  Eve believed him, ate the fruit and gave some to her husband.  Thus, sin was introduced on earth.
  • Everything God is, Satan is not.  God is truth, Satan is not.  The Bible says he is a liar.  Those who follow him are also liars.  “Ye are of [your] father the devil, and the lusts of your father ye will do.  He was a murderer from the beginning, and abode not in the truth, because there is no truth in him. When he speaketh a lie, he speaketh of his own: for he is a liar, and the father of it” John 8:44.
  • God is not of this world, Satan is.  The moment he brought sin into it, it became his.       He is known as the prince of this world.
  • He misuses scriptures, insinuates himself anywhere such as among the disciples, among friends, families and in the church.
  • He is a deceiver.  He and his angels can become whatever they want to be in the war against God and His people.  “And no marvel; for Satan himself is transformed into an angel of light.  Therefore it is no great thing if his ministers also be transformed as the ministers of righteousness; whose end shall be according to their works.” – 2 Corinthians 11:14, 15.  If there are false Christs, false prophets and false apostles then, it is very likely that the Mary seen by many is false as well. Satan uses those close to us to get what he wants.   He knows how to secure men’s worship. 

We are warned about this.  “Let no man deceive you by any means:  for that day shall not come, except there come a falling away first, and that man of sin be revealed, the son of perdition; Who opposeth and exalteth himself above all that is called God, or that is worshipped; so that he as God sitteth in the temple of God, shewing himself that he is God.” – 2 Thessalonians 2:3, 4.  Using the mother of Jesus is one way to secure worship.  He has succeeded in replacing the Bible’s teaching that there is one Intercessor by establishing Mary as the intercessor to the intercessor.

  • Doubt is one of his weapons.  He used it when he deceived Eve.  He was in essence      asking her in Genesis 3:1, “Did God really say that you can’t eat from every tree in the garden?”  In other words, “Are you sure He really said that?”  He makes us doubt God’s word, His love and His promises.  He makes us think that we are so sinful that God cannot possibly forgive us.
  • He is always scheming, looking for a way to get to us.   As soon as he knows our weaknesses, he will use them against us.  He used Cain’s jealousy of Abel; Sarah’s desire for a child; Saul’s jealousy of David; Judas’ weakness for money. 
  • He afflicts people.  “And ought not this woman, being a daughter of Abraham, whom Satan hath bound, lo, these eighteen years, be loosed from this bond on the Sabbath     day?” – Luke 13:16.  It is interesting that Jesus used the Sabbath Day as an illustration of undoing Satan’s work.  He is using the  Lord’s Day to restore God’s creation, which Satan crippled with sin.

Now that we know what the devil is capable of we can better deal with him and the Bible tells us how to do this.  “Submit yourselves therefore to God.  Resist the devil and he will flee from you.  Draw nigh to God, and He will draw nigh to you.  Cleanse your hands, ye sinners; and purify your hearts, ye double minded.” – James 4:7. We are exhorted to be humble for God gives grace to the humble and resists the proud.  It was pride that caused the fall of Lucifer and man.  Humility brings us closer to God.  Pride draws us away.  God’s Word is your best defense against the devil.  Jesus used it in the wilderness when the devil tried to tempt Him.  Take Paul’s advise and “put on the whole armor of God, that you may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil” (Ephesians 6:11).

Fight the good fight of faith” – 1 Timothy 6:12

Faith should be a way of life, not an occasional pastime.  We can’t say we accept Jesus as our Saviour and refuse to follow His example.  Noah and Abraham are the kind of Christians we should aspire to be.  People who did evil things in God’s sight surrounded both men but they never sinned against God.

Faith becomes a habit or an accessory instead of heartfelt conviction and way of life.   People carry their Bible, wear their crucifix and Jesus pin to church but once they leave the church, the Bible goes back on the shelf, the crucifix and pin go back in the jewellery box.  Faith is not something you put on display to impress others.  Faith should be a commitment, a necessity.

Faith should not be a feeling.  It is a belief. We can’t say I feel like being faithful to God today and then tomorrow, we say, the opposite.  We should eat, sleep and drink faith.  We should embrace faith and be steadfast in it.  We should have unwavering faith like Abraham and David whose faith got them through the toughest of times.  Faith is our lifesaver, our anchor, and our hope in good things to come.  Faith is an expression of love for God.  Faith is relying on God to meet our needs, it is to believe that He will take care of us—that He will keep His promises and that He will come through each and every time we turn to Him for help.  Faith should be a long-lasting experience not a quick fix.  Faith is what gets us through tough times.  Faith should be growing stronger not weaker.

People are convinced that they can’t live the way Jesus did because they are ignorant of God’s Word and the power He gives us to live out genuine Christian lives.  They think their behaviour is acceptable because of how other Christians are living—they are looking at their friends, not at Jesus.  God promised that we can do all things through Him. (Philippians 4:13)  He encouraged us to “Be strong and of good courage; do not be afraid, nor be dismayed, for the Lord your God is with you wherever you go.”  (Joshua 1:9)  Among the rulers there were many believers but because of the Pharisees they did not confess Jesus because they were afraid of being put out of the synagogue.  They loved the praise of men more than the praise of God. (John 12:42-43)

People are more concerned with following the example of others than following Jesus.  Jesus warned His disciples about the teaching of the Pharisees and the Sadducees. (Matthew 16:5-12)

Some Christians are more committed than others in their walk with God.  They behave differently than those around them.  Their lives are completely surrendered to God and they stand out from the rest of crowd.  They are God’s peculiar people.  The apostles did not fit in with the rest of the people because they ate with tax collectors and sinners; did not fast; picked and ate grains of wheat on Sabbath; did not wash their hands before they ate.  They gave left their fishing nets, boats, families and homes and followed Jesus.  They gave up everything to follow Jesus.

Other disciples left Him because the things he said to them when they were in Capernaum were hard for them to understand. (John 6:53-66)  However, Peter and the other eleven disciples remained.  When Jesus asked them if they wanted to leave as well, Peter answered, “Lord, to whom shall we go?  You have the words of eternal life.  Also we have come to believe and know that You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.” (John 6:68-69)

We should be like Peter and the other apostles who remained steadfast in their faith.  They stayed with Jesus because they believed that He was who He said He was.  As Christians, if we accept Jesus as our Saviour and believe that He died for our sins, then we should accept all the trials and blessings that come with the faith.  We can’t give up at the first sign of trouble.  We should trust God to see us through hard times just as He did with Paul and the other apostles as they preached the gospel as they were commanded to.  It is better to be persecuted for following Jesus than for committing sin.  It is better to fit in with God’s wonderful plans for our lives than to fit in with the crowd.

Our aim should be to stand out—as one of Christ’s committed followers who are more interested in God’s wisdom than worldly knowledge.  We should want to please God not man or ourselves.  We should enjoy Christianity especially when it calls for real sacrifice because it is our opportunity to show God how much we love Him.  We are God’s children and should start acting like it.

Be of good courage, and he shall strengthen your heart, all ye that hope in the LORD” – Psalm 31:24

Is there any hope?  Yes.  Jesus is our hope for a better life, a life not marred by sin.  Jesus’ death on the Cross gave us hope of having our sins forgiven and having a relationship with God.  Hope for everlasting life—eternal life made possible by Jesus shed blood.  I have hope in the Lord who is faithful and keeps His promises.  I have hope in the Lord because nothing is impossible for Him.  I have hope in the Lord who has plans for my life and who promised that He will guide me.

I have hope in the Lord who never forsakes His children.  I have hope in the Lord who loved us so much that He sent His Son into the world to die for my sins.  God has said and done many things to make us hope and when we hope for something it means that we believe they can happen—that they are possible.  God has taught us that anything is possible and that we can do all things through Him.

  • To hope is to have faith that the thing we hope for is not out of our reach.
  • To hope is to be confident that we can achieve anything we set our hearts on.
  • To hope is to believe that we can have what God means for us to have.
  • To hope is to be assured that we can get what God plans to give us.
  • To hope is to be encouraged because it seems that what we dream of is possible, promising.
  • To hope is to trust that it can and will happen.
  • To hope is to expect it to happen.

Hope springs eternal.  To hope is to trust in the Lord, to look on the bright side, to be optimistic.  As Paul writes in his letter to the church in Rome, “Now hope does not disappoint, because the love of God has been poured out in our hearts by the Holy Spirit who was given to us.” (Romans 5:5)

Hope is the same as faith.  Faith is to believe in that which we cannot see and so is hope.  We don’t know what our futures hold but we can each hope for a bright one.  God promised that He has plans for us so we have those to look forward to and what makes this more exciting is that what God’s plans for us are always beyond our wildest dreams.  Look at how blessed Abraham was after Isaac was born.  He became the father of nations as God promised.  Hannah prayed for a son and was blessed with Samuel and other children.  Leah was blessed with six sons and a daughter and God’s favour.  Ordinary men became great apostles whose gospels and letters we read to give us inspiration and a better insight to who Jesus is.

It is exciting to hope when you read how the lives of these people and others in the Bible changed when they came to know Jesus.  As Paul rightly says, “But if we hope for what we do not see, we eagerly wait for it with perseverance.” (Romans 8:25)  Hope makes us steadfast and more focused on God.

Knowing who God is and what He has done makes it easy for us to hope in Him.  He is loving, kind, merciful, faithful and compassionate.  In Psalm 145:9, David says that the Lord has compassion on all that He has made.  This is true.  He had compassion on Leah who was unloved by her husband.  He had compassion for Hannah who was barren.  He had compassion for the woman who would have been stoned for committing adultery had He not been there.  God does indeed take care of His children and as long as we hold on to that fact, we will always have something to hope for.

That it may be well with us, when we obey the voice of the LORD our God” – Jeremiah 42:6

When Jesus told Simon Peter, James and John, “Do not be afraid.  From now on you will catch men,” they must have trusted Him enough to leave everything behind and follow Him.  They had seen with their own eyes what miraculous things He could.  All night the three men had been fishing and had caught nothing yet when they cast down their nets as Jesus bid them, they caught so much fish that the net holding them was breaking.  The two boats began to sink under the weight of the fish.  How was it possible that the same lake where the men hadn’t caught any fish a moment ago and the minute Jesus told them to cast their nets in, they were bursting with fish?  Jesus had done the impossible.  When, the men saw this, they were astonished.  They probably never caught so much fish in all the years they had been fishing and here Jesus had done it in such a short time.  Possibly ashamed of his reluctance earlier, Peter fell to his knees, saying, “Depart from me, for I am a sinful man, O Lord!”

Jesus told Simon Peter not to be afraid and that from now on, he would catch men.  Simon Peter’s days as a fisherman were over and he was now a follower of Jesus who had great plans for him and the others.  Just imagine how differently things would have turned out if Peter hadn’t decided to literally drop everything and follow Jesus.  He could not have imagined in all his wildest dreams what miraculous things he would be a witness to or that he would be preaching the same gospel he heard Jesus preach to the people from Peter’s boat or that he would be walking on water or that he too would be healing people.  None of these men could ever have imagined that their lives would change so dramatically because they had put their trust and faith in Jesus.  Just like these men, we should leave our worries behind and follow Him.  Catching the fish that had seemed nonexistent a short while ago was Jesus’ way of showing the three men what is impossible for man is not impossible for Him.  And that He could help them to catch bigger and better things if they just allow themselves to trust Him.

When we follow Jesus we are in for a treat.  As He pointed out, “I am the light of the world.  He who follows Me shall not walk in darkness, but have the light of life.”  Peter and the other apostles believed that casting the net in the lake was hopeless because they had been trying all night to catch fish.  Fishing was their livelihood when they weren’t catching any it must have been very frustrating for them.  Then, Jesus came along told them to cast the net in and when they did there was an abundance of fish.  He wanted to show them what would happen if one doesn’t give up every time things don’t go well or as expected.  Jesus wanted to demonstrate through these men that He could penetrate the murky waters of our limited imagination and bring forth treasures that are possible only when we have faith in Him.

Jesus is the Light and when we trust in Him, we will no longer be in the dark about who He is and what He is capable of.  “I will bring the blind by a way they did not know; I will lead them in paths they have not known.  I will make darkness light before them, And crooked places straight.” (Isaiah 42:16)  Jesus led Peter and the other disciples out of spiritual blindness into spiritual awareness.  On that fateful day on the lake, He opened their eyes to His magnificence.  He took them on a journey that forever changed their lives.  They went from reeling in fish to reeling in people.  Jesus taught them everything they needed to know and after His resurrection, He sent them into the world to finish His work.  “All authority in Heaven and on earth has been given to Me.  Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you.  And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age.”  (Matthew 28:18-20)

Just as He had promised, He was always with them, in person when He was here on earth and in spirit after He had returned to His Father in Heaven.  He is with us in spirit and when He calls us to do His work, He is right there alongside us, giving us guidance and all the tools we need to accomplish the task.  He left behind the Holy Spirit who would guide them into all truth; speak only what He hears and tell them what was to come.  In Acts 2, the disciples were gathered in one place on the day of Pentecost when the Holy Spirit filled them and they began to speak in other tongues.  The Holy Spirit enabled them.  Peter addressed the non-believers, reminding them of Jesus and the miracles He performed before them, His crucifixion, and His resurrection.  He called them to repent and be baptized.  That day, about three thousand people accepted Christ and were baptized.  A fellowship of the believers was started; they broke bread, gave to those in need, and praised God who increased the number of people saved.  Jesus was with His disciples throughout their ministry, helping them, as they became fishers of men.

When we obey God we are blessed and through our obedience other people are blessed.  The apostles obeyed Jesus and they were blessed with His teachings, His love and with the Holy Spirit.  They were blessed with the task of spreading the gospel and as a result, others were blessed because they came to know Jesus.    When Moses obeyed God’s call to free the Israelites from Egypt, he had no way of knowing that he would be remembered as one of the greatest prophets of all time.  When Abraham obeyed God and went to a strange land, he had no way of knowing that he would be the father of many nations or that one of his descendants would be one of Israel’s greatest kings or that one of them would be the Messiah.  When Peter and the other fishermen followed Jesus they had no way of knowing that they would be witnesses of miracles or doers of miraculous signs.

O LORD my God, in thee do I put my trust” – Psalm 7:1

 

The more we know someone the more likely we are to trust that person.  The more we spend time with God in meditation and reading the Bible, the more we will know about Him.  I have learned that He listens to me, He answers my prayers and He helps me when we ask Him and He keeps His promises and He disciplines me when I need it. 

I trust Him with my life because I know that he wants only the best for me.  He Himself declared, “For I know the plans I have for you, plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.” (Jeremiah 29:11)

I trust God because of what He has done.  He has demonstrated His love for us through Jesus’ death on the cross.  Jesus died for our sins and reconciled us to God and now we don’t have to worry about anything.  God will take care of us just as He took care of His Son while He was here on earth.  Peter encourages us to, “therefore humble yourselves under the mighty hand of God, that He may exalt you in due time, casting all your care upon Him, for He cares for you.” (1 Peter 5:6-7) 

When we let go and let God, we are releasing ourselves from constantly worrying about the future and things we have no control over.  By letting go and letting God, we are showing Him that we trust Him to do what He has promised to do and that is to take care of us.  “I am the Lord your God, who teaches you what is best for you, who directs you in the way you should go.” (Isaiah 48:17)

So when it comes to faith we need to walk the walk. To walk with God is to follow His ways, to surrender to Him, to do as He commands and to follow His example.  As Christians, it is expected of us.  “And what does the Lord require of you But to do justly, To love mercy, And to walk humbly with your God?” (Micah 6:8)  It means that we should give Him lordship over our lives and that we should move forward in faith.  Abraham walked with God and when God told him to pack up his belongings and move to a strange land, Abraham went forward in faith.  Noah was a righteous man who walked with God.  Enoch walked with God.  By faith the disciples followed Jesus when He called them and by faith they stayed with Him when the others no longer walked with him.  Their reason for staying with Him was, “Lord, to whom shall we go?  You have the words of eternal life.  Also we have come to believe and know that you are the Christ, the Son of the living God.”  (John 6:68-69)

By faith they continued to walk in Him—sharing the importance of Jesus death on the cross, the promise of salvation and the good news of His resurrection.  By faith they trusted God to see them through the many tribulations they faced during their ministry.  They were steadfast despite adversity because they were walking in faith and had dedicated their lives to Jesus.  “But when you do good and suffer, if you take it patiently, this is commendable before God.  For to this you were called because Christ also suffered for us, leaving us an example, that you should follow His steps.” (1 Peter 2:20-21)

Jesus had warned them that they would be persecuted, put in prisons, brought before kings and rulers for His name’s sake.  He warned that parents, brothers, relatives and friends would betray them and that some of them would be put to death.  “And you will be hated by all for My name’s sake.” (Luke 21:12-17) But, Jesus also had this assurance for His disciples, “But not a hair of your head will perish.  By standing firm you will gain life.” (Luke 21:18-19)  As long as we walk by faith we will never be lost or alone.  God is with us.


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